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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of I B P ecological sites in subarctic Canada found in the catalog.

I B P ecological sites in subarctic Canada

Canadian Committee for the International Biological Programme. Region 10, Yukon and Northwest Territories.

I B P ecological sites in subarctic Canada

areas recommended as ecological sites in Region 10, Yukon and Northwest Territories, boreal forest to the treeline

by Canadian Committee for the International Biological Programme. Region 10, Yukon and Northwest Territories.

  • 166 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by University of Lethbridge Production Services in Lethbridge, Alta .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ecology -- Northwest Territories.,
  • Ecology -- Yukon Territory.,
  • Landscape protection -- Northwest Territories,
  • Landscape protection -- Yukon Territory

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. xiii-xiv.

    Statementa contribution of the Canadian Committee of the International Biological Programme, Conservation of Terrestrial Biological Communities Subcommittee, Region 10 panel.
    ContributionsBeckel, Dorothy K. B., 1924-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH77C393 C35
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, 163 p. :
    Number of Pages163
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20657062M

    A majority of the Yukon to Newfoundland is occupied by the Subarctic People. Despite occupying parts of the seven provinces and two territories, the Subarctic People group has the lowest population, w people. Types of houses varied, but they were all easy to take down and set up since the Subarctic People were nomadic.. To validate ecological products obtained from satellites, such as a leaf area index (LAI), above‐ground biomass (AGB), and a fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR), we made the allometric equations of leaf mass and AGB of Picea also observed its ecological parameters, in addition, we report LAI, AGB, and fAPAR within the m × m area, which is the.

    This chapter explores the antiquity and evolution of Subarctic maritime traditions in the Beringian North Pacific—precursors of maritime cultures that ultimately pushed north and east across the Canadian and Greenlandic Arctic. Boat-based, maritime economies and settlement show up by the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in the relatively warm Subarctic Northeast Pacific (Gulf of Alaska and Cited by: 4. The authors suggest that the book represents ' the first full synthesis of modern scientific and applied research on urban climates '. Of this there is no doubt, and thus it is a book of monumental importance for researchers, educators, and students of urban climate science and urban environments.' Anthony J. Brazel - Arizona State UniversityCited by:

    These ecosystems are found only on land. What is the CRD? The Capital Regional District (CRD) is the regional government for 13 municipalities and three electoral areas on southern Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands, serving more than , people. Online shopping for Books from a great selection of Ecology, Animals, Environment, Fauna, Conservation, Reference & more at everyday low prices.4/5.


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I B P ecological sites in subarctic Canada by Canadian Committee for the International Biological Programme. Region 10, Yukon and Northwest Territories. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ecological sites of the Boreal Subarctic Subregion: first approximation. The Boreal Subarctic natural subregion is found on elevated plateaus of far northern Alberta, and encompasses about three per cent of the Boreal Forest Natural Region. This book is the only comprehensive account of biodiversity in Canada.

(David W. Schindler, Killam Memorial Professor of Ecology University of Alberta, Edmonton (Winner of the Stockholm Water Prize and the Volvo Environment Prize))Cited by: Biodiversity in Canada: Ecology, Ideas, and Action edited by Stephen Bocking Book Description: Biodiversity in Canada tackles the formidable and critically important or years.

Such a description would establish the relative condition of this country’s genes, species, ecosystems, ecological functions/processes, and water/land/air. ecological sites for the boreal subarctic subregion First approximation This is the first approximation of the plant communities of the Boreal Subarctic Natural Size: 1MB.

Abstract. Lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) that breed in subarctic and arctic Canada are overabundant due to a number of anthropogenic influences, including climateFirst Nations Cree from subarctic Ontario, Canada, participated in a regional spring harvest of overabundant snow geese—these geese have caused desertification of the Author: Leonard J.

Tsuji, Meaghan Wilton, Nicole F. Spiegelaar, Maren Oelbermann, Christine D. Barbeau, A. In a survey of 37 lakes and ponds in Subarctic Quebec, 9 (24%) and 3 (8%) waterbodies were below pH 6, and 5, respectively (Swadling et al.

Overall, these results suggest that in thick. Subarctic. This culture encompassed mobile bands of Algonquian speaking Cree and Innu east of Hudson Bay, and Athabascan-speaking Chipewyans, Dogrib, Hare, Dene-thah (Slavey), Dunne-za (Beaver), Gwich’in, Tutchone, Tahltan, and Dakelh to the west.

Dene groups in the Subarctic area include the Dene Nation (Tlicho, Chipewyan, Gwich’in, Dene Tha' & Dehcho, Sahtú), Tlingit, Tagish, Tahltan, Tutchone, Kaska, Han, Tsetsaut (extinct), Sekani, Dane-zaa and T'atsaot'ine, while Algonquian groups include the Ojibwa, Cree, Atikamekw, Innu and Beothuk (extinct).

Residing within the five million km 2 zone of northern or boreal coniferous forest, the Subarctic People stretched across seven provinces and two territories with three-quarters of the land situated on the Canadian Shield.

Extending from the arctic tundra to the mountains, winters are long and harsh, temperatures often reaching ° C with the forest cover and snow supplying shelter for the. SOIL AND AGRICULTURAL PROBLEMS IN SUBARCTIC AND ARCTIC CANADA The technical staff at each of the stations consists of a resident officer in charge, and two or three students from agricultural colleges during the open season.

The first progress reports of these stations (Abbott, ; Gilbey, ) have now been published and show that experimental work has con. Lithic provenance analyses offer means to reconstruct ancestral social relationships in Subarctic North America. We summarize sourced obsidian data from archaeological sites in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, and interpret obsidian distribution through the Holocene with particular attention to the volcanic White River Ash East event of A.D.

–Author: Todd J. Kristensen, P. Gregory Hare, Ruth M. Gotthardt, Norman A. Easton, John W. Ives, Robert J. The people of the Western Subarctic speak Athapascan. Examples: the Tutchone, Gwich'in (formerly Kutchin), the Han, the Dene, the Tagish, the Tahltan, the Tsetsaut, the Kaska and the Sekani.

Examples: the Tutchone, Gwich'in (formerly Kutchin), the Han, the Dene, the Tagish, the Tahltan, the Tsetsaut, the Kaska and the Sekani. Transportation: The main transportation of the Subarctic People was walking.

Survival depended on being able to travel long distances. Snowshoes were essential for winter travel. Heavy loads were transported on toboggans and, in the far northwest sleds were pulled both by dogs and people. Aboriginally few dogs were available for traction.

The term “Subarctic peoples” describes a number of different and unique groups. Dene groups in the Subarctic area include the Dene Nation (Tlicho, Chipewyan, Gwich’in, Dene Tha' & Dehcho, Sahtú), Tlingit, Tagish, Tahltan, Tutchone, Kaska, Han, Tsetsaut (extinct), Sekani, Dane-zaa and T'atsaot'ine, while Algonquian groups include the Ojibwa, Cree, Atikamekw, Innu and Beothuk (extinct).

Get this from a library. Ecological sites in northern Canada. [David N Nettleship; Pauline A Smith; Canadian Committee for the International Biological Programme. Panel 9.;] -- A listing of 71 biologically important areas in the Canadian north which members of CCIBP-CT Panel 9 feel should be given a high level of consideration for protection, special management, or study.

Natural Region and plant species list. x Colin Stone (Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, Public Lands and Forests Division) — Parkland Natural Region. x Drajs Vujnovic (Parks and Protected Areas, Alberta Community Development, Edmonton, AB) — various Natural Regions.

Ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas (EBSAs) are areas within Canada's oceans that have been identified through formal scientific assessments as having special biological or ecological significance when compared with the surrounding marine ecosystem. Failure to define an area as an EBSA does not mean that it is unimportant ecologically.

Ecology: A Canadian Context presents the fundamentals of ecology within a Canadian context while integrating evolution and the concept of sustainability wherever it is relevant. In addition to covering the core concepts of ecology, this title profiles the extensive ecological research being conducted in Canada.

A Review With Particular Reference to Subarctic Quebec, Canada Jean-Claude Dionne ABSTRACT Dionne, J.-C., Ice action in the lacustrine environment. A review with particular reference to subarctic Quebec, Canada. Earth-Sci. Rev., Cited by: The applicability of A. Omran's 'epidemiologic transition' theory to subarctic Indians in Canada is examined in a historical review of health and demographic : Kue Young.

The literature for Sphagnum production from arctic to temperate regions showed that hummock NPP was less than that of adjacent lawn/hollow sites and that a significant (r 2 =P Cited by:   The transmission of 93 items of women's indigenous knowledge and bush skills was studied in two subarctic Omushkego (West Main) Cree Indian communities, Moose Factory and Peawanuck, Ontario, Canada.

About half of all bush skills Cited by: ecological shift from boreal forest to steppe tundra. Mastodons thereafter became restricted to areas south of the continental ice sheets, where they suffered complete extinction ∼10, 14C years B.P. Mastodons were already absent from eastern Beringia several Cited by: