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2 edition of Hume"s theory of the passions and of morals found in the catalog.

Hume"s theory of the passions and of morals

Alfred Bouligny Glathe

Hume"s theory of the passions and of morals

a study of Books II and III of the "Treatise."

by Alfred Bouligny Glathe

  • 275 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by University of California Press in Berkeley .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hume, David, 1711-1776.,
  • Emotions.,
  • Conduct of life.

  • Edition Notes

    Based on thesis--University of California.

    SeriesUniversity of California publications in philosophy,, v. 24
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsB21 .C25 vol.24
    The Physical Object
    Pagination175 p.
    Number of Pages175
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL198308M
    LC Control Numbera 50009371
    OCLC/WorldCa1901465

    Elizabeth S. Radcliffe, Hume, Passion, and Action, Oxford University Press, , pp., $ (hbk), ISBN Reviewed by Simon Blackburn, Trinity College, Cambridge For many years philosophy that is focused on ethics, or action, or human desire, or just human nature in general, has revolved around something called the Humean.   Dan Robinson gives the seventh of eight lectures on Reid's critique of David Hume at Oxford. In his Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals [], Hume states: "The .

      A video on the moral philosophy of Hume and Kant. Skip navigation Hume and Kant on reason, passions, and morality 7 David Hume's Sentimentalist Theory of Morals - Duration. Reason is the slave of the passions in the sense that practical reason alone cannot give rise to moral motivation; it is altogether dependent on pre-existing desires that furnish motivational force. For Hume, this is not a fact we should lament (as moralists do) but a basic fact about our psychology.

    sents Hume's moral theory as self-consistent; and I shall trace out some of the consequences of reading Hume this way. According to common sense, morality is a stable and shared system of evaluation, one that transcends the individual and the moment. call it a passion. 2. Hume: Calm Passion and a Passion for Calm I begin with Hume. My exposition of Hume's account of the foundation of morality will proceed in three steps. First, I will remind you of Hume's well-known argument for his thesis that reason is and ought only to be the slave of the passions.


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Hume"s theory of the passions and of morals by Alfred Bouligny Glathe Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hume's Theory of the Passions and the Morals, a Study of Books II and III of the Treatise [Alfred B. Glathe] on *FREE* shipping Humes theory of the passions and of morals book qualifying offers.

Read this book on Questia. If the philosophy of Hume is lacking in fundamental consistency and clarity of theoretic aim, it has surely met with the fate which it deserves; for not even the theories of Kant or Hegel, both supposedly much more obscure writers, have received.

Hume’s main ethical writings are Book 3 of his Treatise of Human Nature, “Of Morals” (which builds on Book 2, “Of the Passions”), his Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals, and some of his Essays.

James Baillie provides us with a map to Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise, focusing on Hume's theory of the passions and morality. This book sets out its principal ideas and arguments of the Treatise in a clear and readable way and is ideal for anyone coming to Hume's work for the first time.

Such a feeling, Hume argues, must be the basis for the sort of general and unselfish concern for welfare of others that morality requires of us. And since this sentiment is a common component of human nature, it provides morality with a non-parochial basis/5(13). Hume describes both direct passions, such as desire, aversion, grief, joy, hope, and fear, and indirect passions, such as pride, humility, love, and hatred.

Hume then distinguishes between the cause and the object of the passions. Hume's account of the passions is largely neglected because the author's purposes tend to be missed.

The passions were accepted by early modern philosophers, of whatever persuasion, as the mental effects of bodily by: 4. Since all of our most scientific beliefs have exactly the same foundation, this account preserves the natural dignity of moral judgments. Hume devoted the second book of the Treatise to an account of the human passions and a discussion of their role in the operation of the human will.

It is our feelings or sentiments, Hume claimed, that exert practical influence over human volition and action. Hume's account of the passions is largely neglected because the author's purposes tend to be missed.

The passions were accepted by early modern philosophers, of whatever persuasion, as the mental Author: Stephen Buckle. Presuppose that everyone has similarly structured sensations and passions.

Because of this similarity we can see in others' actions the effects of certain passions. We might also perceive the causes of certain passions. 2 and 3 convey to us an idea of these passions (due to our own experiences of them).

Hume’s moral philosophy is found primarily in Book 3 of The Treatise of Human Nature and his Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, although further context and explanation of certain concepts discussed in those works can also be found in his Essays Moral, Political, and Literary.

second kind are the passions of love and hatred, grief and joy, pride and humility—these are ‘passions’ properly so-called. This division is far from exact: poetry and music frequently produce intense raptures that are far from calm; while those other impressions—the passions properly so-called—canFile Size: KB.

When Hume turns to our moral “sense” in Book III of the Treatise, he largely abandons talk of passions in favor of “sentiment.” He still takes it that our sense of the morality of an action or character is motivating; for one, it moves us to pursue or avoid the action or person.

An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals (EPM) is a book by Scottish enlightenment philosopher David Hume. In it, Hume argues (among other things) that the foundations of morals lie with sentiment, not reason.

An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals is the enquiry subsequent to the Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (EHU). Thus. Tom Beauchamp presents the definitive scholarly edition of two famous works by David Hume, both originally published in In A Dissertation on the Passions Hume sets out his original view of the nature and central role of passion and emotion.

The Natural History of Religion is a landmark work in the study of religion as a natural phenomenon. The Theory of Moral Sentiments is a book by Adam Smith.

It provided the ethical, philosophical, psychological, and methodological underpinnings to Smith's later works, including The Wealth of Nations (), Essays on Philosophical Subjects (), and Lectures on Justice, Police, Revenue, and Arms () (first published in ).Author: Adam Smith.

Hume: Morality Is Based on Sentiment Hume: Morality is Based on Sentiment This paper will attempt to give a detailed breakdown of David Hume’s take on morality, and how some of the other philosophers would critique his stance.I will first speak about why Hume believes reason and passion don’t contradict each I will give Aristotle’s and Aquinas’ view on this conclusion of his.

HUME'S POSITIVE THEORY OF PERSONAL IDENTITY various causes which produce these passions. These include: a concern for our moral character, our health and physical appearance, our social standing and family relations, our property, and reputation.

In this paper I will summarize my examination of the first two topic areas only. Though many philosophers, like Saint Augustine, argue that humans are morally different from animals because of their capability to reason, Hume states that it is passion and sentiment that determines morality.

In his book, Treatise with Human Nature, Hume claims that vice and virtue stems from the pleasure or pain we, mankind, feel in response. David Hume () is unquestionably one of the most influential philosophers of the Modern period.

Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, his philosophical works include A Treatise on Human Nature (), Essays, Moral and Political (2 vols., ), An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (), and An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of. Moral Theory: Relativism In the United s the innocent kiss in the park by a young couple is looked uponas a cute display of in India the practice is frowned on and can result in severe social sanctions.

Prostitutes can openly display their wares and market their vocation in the Netherlands, but in the United States that same activity could result in a prison term.David Hume, an 18th century philosopher, stated that morality is based on sentiments rather than reason.

He concluded this after he developed his “theory” of knowledge which stated that everything we could know was observable by the senses — he was a naturalistic philosopher.

DAVID HUME ON REASON, PASSIONS AND MORALS Perhaps the most notorious passage in Hume's Treatise is the one that concerns the relative roles of reason and passions, where he says: Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions (T ).